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PSI BETA, the Honor Society in Psychology of Spartanburg Methodist College, will host Patricia S. Ravenhorst, director and immigration attorney of the South Carolina Immigrant Victim Network, a program of the South Carolina Victim Assistance Network (SCVAN), at 3 p.m. Thursday, March 27, 2014 in the SMC Davis Mission Chapel to discuss Human Trafficking and Sex Slavery.

The public is invited and encouraged to attend.

Human sex trafficking is the most common form of modern-day slavery and it is the fastest-growing business of organized crime and the third-largest criminal enterprise in the world. Estimates place the number of its domestic and international victims in the millions, mostly females and children enslaved in the commercial sex industry for little or no money.

Human sex trafficking is the most common form of modern-day slavery and it is the fastest-growing business of organized crime and the third-largest criminal enterprise in the world. Estimates place the number of its domestic and international victims in the millions, mostly females and children enslaved in the commercial sex industry for little or no money.

The terms human trafficking and sex slavery usually conjure up images of young girls beaten and abused in faraway places, like Eastern Europe, Asia, or Africa. Actually, human sex trafficking and sex slavery happen locally in cities and towns, both large and small, throughout the United States, right in citizens’ backyards. The US not only faces an influx of international victims but also has its own homegrown problem of interstate sex trafficking of minors.

Today, the business of human sex trafficking is organized and violent. These abusive methods of control impact the victims both physically and mentally. Similar to cases involving Stockholm Syndrome, these victims, who have been abused over an extended period of time, begin to feel an attachment to the perpetrator. This paradoxical psychological phenomenon makes it difficult for law enforcement to breach the bond of control, albeit abusive, the trafficker holds over the victim.

 

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